Parliament reviews the passing of a new Bill of Rights undermining the ECHR authority

While the country faces a cost of living crisis, the government’s main focus is stripping away your human rights.


FILE PHOTO: The courtroom of the European Court of Human Rights is seen in Strasbourg, France, September 11, 2019. REUTERS/Vincent Kessler/File Photo
FILE PHOTO: The courtroom of the European Court of Human Rights is seen in Strasbourg, France, September 11, 2019. REUTERS/Vincent Kessler/File Photo
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LONDON (Bywire News) - Parliament will debate a new Bill of Rights which could give the government the power to disregard rulings from the European Court of Human Rights. 

The legislation is a response to last week’s injunction which prevented the first flight taking refugees to Rwanda. The new bill represents an unholy fudge in which Britain would remain a signatory to the Convention, but give itself permission to disregard future rulings. Among other things, the bill will make it easier to deport foreign criminals by disregarding key tenets of the convention including the right to family life. 

The government attempted to justify the bill by suggesting it might improve the freedom of press and expression. However, the only freedom it truly offers is the ability for Ministers to ride roughshod over the rights of migrants or indeed anyone else who comes into their sights. 

Dominic Raab, British Deputy Prime Minister, stated: "These reforms will reinforce freedom of speech, enable us to deport more foreign offenders and better protect the public from dangerous criminals." 

In response, Sacha Deshmukh, Chief Executive at Amnesty International UK said, “It’s very troubling that the UK government is prepared to damage respect for the authority of the European court of human rights because of a single decision that it doesn’t like.”

“This is not about tinkering with rights, it’s about removing them.”

The President of the Law Society of England and Wales, Stephanie Boyce, described the bill as a “lurch backwards for British justice”. He warned that it could create an “acceptable class of human rights abuses in the United Kingdom”.

The bill will be reviewed later on Wednesday.

(Writing by Anna Kapanadze, editing by Tom Cropper and Klaudia Fior)

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